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March 1998
1998 Editors' Awards February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 September 1998 October 1998

 

AMERICAN FEDERATION

OF

MINERALOGICAL SOCIETIES

Newsletter - March, 1998

 

1997-98 AFMS SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION HONOREES - Louellen Montgomery >

DEE'S DOINGS - Dee Holland >

IN MEMORY >

THE AMERICAN FEDERATION WAYS & MEANS?ENDOWMENT FUND - Charles Leach >

EACH CLUB - EACH YEAR - ONE ROCKHOUND - Honorees >

EACH CLUB - EACH YEAR - ONE ROCKHOUND - Method - Bonnie Glismann >

NAGANO REPORT - AND CAN YOU SAY SUGILITE AND AKAGANEITE By Hiroyasu Ichikawa >

VIDEOS RECEIVE A.F.M.S. AWARDS - Marge Collins >

MINERALS HEAVEN! - 1998 AFMS -- MWF CONVENTION - Steve Whelan >

PUBLICATION INFORMATION >

1997-98 AFMS SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION HONOREES
Louellen Montgomery, President
AFMS SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION, INC

CALIFORNIA EASTERN MIDWEST
NORTHWEST ROCKY MOUNTAIN SOUTH CENTRAL

The Honorary Award winners from six Regional Federations have selected two graduate students to receive AFMS Scholarship Foundation grants for the 1997-98 school year.
All grants are for $2,000.00 each per year. 362 students have received grants since the first grant of $300.00 was given in 1965, for a total of $818,650.00. The generous support of the AFMS societies and their members have made this possible.
Following is a list of the students receiving scholarship grants this year, including those who are receiving the second year of the 1996-97 grants:

CALIFORNIA FEDERATION


Isabelle Sacramento Grilo, a native of Portugal, received her BS in Geology and Environmental Studies at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and is studying for her MS in Geological Sciences at San Diego State University. Her research focuses on the geological development and tectonic evolution of the western Cordillera.
Michael G. Sommers received his BS in Geology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and is working on his Ph.D. in Geological Sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research involves the aspects of stromatolite microstructure using digital image analysis relating to biogenicity of stromatolites from Mink Mountain, Ontario, Canada.
The 1996-97 students, Steven E. Borron and Bill Hanson, continue their work for their MS degrees at San Diego State University.

SCHOLARS INDEX

EASTERN FEDERATION:


Peter E. Tice received a BS in Geology from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; his MS at the University of New Orleans, Louisiana, where he is working on his Ph.D. in Mineralogy and Geochemistry. His research project is about the alkaline and undersaturated pegmatites especially in regard to an alkaline pegmatite dike in the Mont Saint-Hilaire complex.
James W. Nizamoff received his B.A. in Geology at the University of Maine, Farmington. He is studying for his MS in Geology at the University of New Orleans, Louisiana, where his research interests concern the mineralogy, geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Palermo #2 and related pegmatites at North Groton, New Hampshire.
The 1.996-97 students were selected in March 1997 and received the first year of their grants at that time. They are: Patricia A. Wood and Barry Bickmore, both working on their Ph.D. degrees at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, Virginia. The second year of their grants has not been issued to date.
SCHOLARS INDEX

MIDWEST FEDERATION:


Nicole Albright, a native of Monaca, Pennsylvania, received her BS in Geology at the College of Charleston, South Carolina. She is attending the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, working on her MS in Geosciences. Her research project involves the use of Geographic Information Systems and remote sensing to solve geologic problems.
Connie Kaplan received her BA at the University of Colorado and a master's degree in Education at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Her research project will concern Geology as she pursues her Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln.
James David Jacobson, one of the 1996-97 students, continues work on his MS in Environmental Geophysics at Indiana University, Bloomington. Cari E. Meyers is receiving the second year of the grant to Keri Anderson, and is studying for her MS in Geology at the University of Illinois, Urbana.

SCHOLARS INDEX

NORTHWEST FEDERATION:


Forest J. Gahn received an Associate Science degree in Geology at Ricks College, Rexburg, Idaho; his BS in Geology at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, and is studying for his MS degree at the University of Cincinnati, Ohio. His research project pertains to the field of Paleontology.
The 1996-97 students were not selected until in March 1997 and received the first year of their grants at that time. They are Kristine M. Bovy and Chuntaek Seong, both working on their Ph.D. degrees in Archaeology at the University of Washington, Seattle. The second year of their grants have not been issued at this time.
Arvid K. Aase also received an Associate Science degree in Geology at Ricks College, Rexburg, Idaho; his BS in Geology at Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah. He received his M.S. in Geology at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, where he is working on his Ph.D. in Geology. His objective is to be a Geology instructor on the college level.

SCHOLARS INDEX

ROCKY MOUNTAIN FEDERATION

:
Juan Carlos Moo a received both his BA in Physical Geography and his MA in Geo-morphology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He is studying for his Ph.D. in Geology at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His objective is to develop research in tectonics and active tectonic geomorphology.
Sara-Eva Martinez-Alonso received her BS in Geological Sciences and the equivalent of an MS in Geological Sciences, both, from the University of Barcelona, Spain. Her Ph.D. thesis pertains to the variation of muscovite/illite as an alteration mineral in porphyry copper and epithermal mineral deposits.
Kristen Coose continues her studies at New Mexico Tech, Socorro, working on her MS in Geology/mineralogy. Virgina Wong continues work on her Ph.D. in Geology at the University of Texas at El Paso.

SCHOLARS INDEX

SOUTH CENTRAL FEDERATION:



Susan D. Anderson, a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, received her BS in Geology at Louisiana State University and is pursuing her MS in Geology at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research concerns metamorphic petrology, the eclogites and high-pressure metamorphism in the Llano Uplift region of central Texas.
David M. Hirsch received his BS in Geology at the University of California, Los Angeles. His Ph.D. research at the University of Texas at Austin seeks to answer the question "Why do metamorphic rocks look the way they do?" He hopes to obtain a teaching position upon graduation.
The 1996-97 students, Pamela Owen and Rion H. Camerlo, continue their studies at the University of Texas at Austin with Pamela working on her Ph.D. in Geological Sciences, and Rion, his M.S. in Structural Geology.

SCHOLARS INDEX

A QUICK, CHEAP FLUORESCENT LIGHT may be made by cutting cobalt blue glass from a stained glass dealer into a replacement lens for your flashlight. - Glacier Gravel via Breccia

PROTECT YOUR ARMS from edges on cab machines by covering the edges with water pipe or air conditioning line insulation

INDEX


DEE'S DOINGS

Dee Holland
AFMS President

At the AFMS meeting in Jackson Mississippi, the AFMS recognized the ALAA as their lobbying arm; but this recognition came with no monetary funds being forwarded from the AFMS. At the present time the ALAA have two bills that have been sent to the Congress of the United States. These are the Fossil Bill and the Rock and Mineral Act. At this time ALAA is trying to get these introduced into the Senate and House of Representatives. I have been informed that there will be a mailing from the ALAA President Jon Sponaogle to all clubs in the AFMS, with an explanation of the two Bills as well as an explanation of the Wewer Letter, which was paid for by ALAA, and is a legal explanation of what clubs can do monetarily and personally toward lobbying. The ALAA and AFMS encourages everyone to write to their Representatives in the
Senate and House of Representatives to ask for their support of these bills. If anyone needs the address of their Representatives in Washington D.C. these are (at least in the west)

The AFMS Newsletter is the means we have of communicating what is happening in the AFMS to the Regional Federations and the individual clubs, there were 778 clubs within the seven Regional Federations as of Nov. 1, 1997. There were 1863 newsletters printed for the last isssue. This includes copies to all AFMS past Presidents, current officers, all AFMS and
Regional Federation chairpersons and three copies to each club in all Regional Federations, that the AFMS Central office has addresses for. Please get your updated address lists to the Central office.

INDEX


IN MEMORY

Leslie L. Darling, Jr.
Oct. 25, 1908 - Nov. 30, 1997

President AFMS 1969-70
President CFMS 1965-1966

IN MEMORY

Harriet George
AFMS Competition Judge

Wife of Calvin George

INDEX

The American Federation
Ways & Means/Endowment Fund
.
Charles Leach, Chairman
AFMS Endowment Fund.

In 1984 the AFMS Ways & Means/Endowment Fund Committee came into its own. A major effort was started to raise funds for the AFMS. Some of the methods used were:

Asking clubs to become a VIP Club. This required each club to donate $1.00 per member. This was very successful. The YE OLD TIMERS MINERAL CLUB and the ROLLIN ROCK CLUB have been two of our best supporters. We now have some clubs in the 1200% class. We still encourage clubs to participate.

Minerals of the World Charts were very successful. The committee sold over 5000 of them, also over 200 VIP pins sets were sold. We still have 6 sets remaining.

We have made some individuals "Fellows of the American Federation". The following is a list of "AFMS FELLOWS": Henry Bonar, Bill Cox, Bill Burns, David Rosin, Charles Leach, Einor Loftesness, Robert Mount, Jim Howell, Yvonne Dodson, Russel Trepnell, E.F. Dickerson, David R. Kiel, John Mastin, Don Caudle, Dick Swartz, Jim Brown, Jr., Fred Matike, Donald B. Langston, Margaret J. Bonar, Barbara Goss Pettit, Ruth Bailey, William J. Maloney, Lauren Williams, Edward S. Slagle, Ed Immel, Harold Dodson.

The members of the Regional Federations have been very generous. Thank for your past support.

 

INDEX


EACH CLUB - EACH YEAR - ONE ROCKHOUND

David and Marilyn Inselman, Rough and Tumbled Rock & Gem Club, Ponca City, OK, are being recognized for their outstanding service to the club. David has provided us with a comfortable, appropriate place to meet at his place of business. He has been Iris Festival Committee Chair for two years and Oktoberfest Committee Chair for one year. He was selected as Trustee in 1998. Marilyn and David consistently support club activities, especially for their daughter, Meredith, and other children. Their good ideas have added vitality to the club.

INDEX

EACH CLUB-EACH YEAR-
ONE ROCKHOUND

by Bonnie Glismann, Chair

The AFMS recognition program, EACH CLUB-EACH YEAR-ONE ROCKHOUND, is a continuous program in which each club is allowed to recognize one member each year for their outstanding work as rockhounds. Nominations can be submitted at any time during the year. There is no deadline date. Also, no waiting to see your nominee recognized. Nominations will be submitted for publication throughout the year.

The AFMS Committee makes no distinction as to who is recognized and who is not. ALL names submitted for recognition will be published in the AFMS Newsletter. The only restriction is that each club may submit only one nomination per year. For this program, married couples are considered as "one". If a club submits a second nomination within a year, that nomination will be held and published the next year.

Reasons for the nomination should be kept short and simple. Please tell us the name of the club, city and state where located and the individual sending the information.
Nominations should be sent to your Federation representative. We look foreword to
hearing from all our AFMS affiliated clubs.
AFMS - Bonnie Glismann, 4326 S. 200th West, Ogden UT, 84405, (801) 392-7832
CFMS - Grant & Toni Ewers, 12 Hillcrest Lane, Boulder City, NV 89005-1607 (702) 293-5106
EFMLS - Duane Evans, 28 Ash St., Portsmouth RI 02871 (401) 683-9536
MFMS - Nellie Claxton, 1001 Wilshire Dr., Mt. Vernon, IL 61102 (618) 242-2193
NFMS - Jean Brooks, 1405 Clearbrook Dr., SE, Apt. F104, Lacy, WA 98503 (360) 493-8380
RMFMS - Mary Clough, 3065 Everett, Wichita, KS 67217 (316) 943-2267
SCFMS - Virginia Brotherton, 2512 Bamberry Dr., Ft. Worth, TX 76133 (817) 346-1583
SFMS - Dee Conybear, 606 Timberlane Dr Lake Mary FL 32746 407-324-3846

We've all heard of the great painter Vincent Van Gogh. But how many know the rest of the family? His grandfather was from Yugoslavia - U. Gogh. One uncle was a magician - Wheredidit Gogh. His aunt was somewhat excentric - Verti Gogh. And he had a brother no one liked - Justplease Gogh.

HUH?
I think that all right-thinking people in this country are sick and tired of being told that ordinary, decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. I'm certainly not! But I'm sick and tired of being told that I am! -- Monty Python

INDEX

NAGANO REPORT
By Hiroyasu Ichikawa
Hiroyasu@mb.infoweb.or.jp
Japanese Rockhound

There is a moonstone locality in Nagano. The site is southeast lakeside (close to wind surfing port*) of Lake Kizaki which is in the northwest of Nagano prefecture. Moonstone occurs as phenocryst in alkali-quartz-porphyry. Refer to:
http://village.infoweb.ne.jp/~hiroyasu/sanchi.htm
*near the wind surfing port there is spar and public bath!!
And, a Sugilite picture from type locality (though not aesthetic one) plus a short story of Sugilite is at
http://village.infoweb.ne.jp/~hiroyasu/sugi.htm
Next Wednesday I'm going to collect Yugawaralite. I've just got the information of the spot!! For a couple of months 1-3(max)cm ones have been found near Seikoshi mine in Shizuoka prefecture, Japan.

INDEX

AND CAN YOU SAY
SUGILITE AND AKAGANEITE
.

Sugilite was named after Japanese mineralogist. But in Japanese pronunciation, we don't call like 'Susie'-lite. It's near to 'Su-gwi'-lite in Japanese.

Also the same problem in Akaganeite. This was named after a mine in Japan. How does native English speaker read it? Like 'Eika-gan-eight'? We call the mine like 'Ar-ka-gwa-ne'-ite (ne' as in neck). However, recently, an apostrophe was added on the 'e' letter. I feel it's somewhat strange, though this is caused by the difference of syllables between 2 languages.

INDEX


VIDEOS RECEIVE A.F.M.S. AWARDS
reviewed by Marge Collins
AFMS Program Competition coordinator

Two video presentations were cited for "Excellence in Education" in the 1997 Program Competition. Copies may be purchased from the author/producers or may be borrowed for viewing from each of the Regional Program Libraries by affiliated Clubs and their members. (All programs produced 'for resale' are eligible for this award. Contact your Regional Librarian or the Program Competition coordinator for information about these videos and Rules for competition.)

"INTRICATE INTARSIA"
Produced by Philip Magistro (RLM Creations), 1997. Color, 39 min., $39.95 + shipping & handling.
If you want to go beyond the basic miniature mosaics called 'intarsia' as shown in Mr. Magistro's first presentation "Introduction to Intarsia" (1996) you will find the information you need in "Intricate Intarsia".
Detailed instructions of how to create more complex patterns of colored stones are shown and carefully described in this video. An instructor at Wildacres, Magistro is well qualified to lead the adventurous lapidary into more creative realms.
One does not need a working knowledge of lapidary techniques to appreciate the careful craftsmanship necessary to create these striking cabochons or the value placed on these works of art after seeing how they are made step by step. Thus, this video can be shown at Club meetings as a way to inspire the budding lapidary and to give others an insight into the skills and
time it takes to create an intarsia. But without the basic instructions given in "Introduction to Intarsia" it will be difficult for most to complete the more complex projects shown in this presentation
This is very professional production and is highly recommended for those seeking more information on this select subject.

"CUSTOM WIRE WRAP"
PARTS ONE AND TWO
Produced by Alice Turner, 1997. Color, 76 and 53 min., $20.00 ea. + shipping/handling
This two-part presentation was produced with the student of wire wrap in mind. As an instructor at Wm. Holland School of Lapidary Arts, Alice had numerous requests for a presentation of this type. Students wanted a refresher of the techniques and patterns they learned during the workshop.
But these videos can help anyone wanting to learn or practice the art of 'wrapping' cabochons and other gems with 14k gold filled wire to create lovely jewelry such as bracelets, earrings, rings and pendants. You will find information about the materials, tools and techniques. Turner also shares the many tips she learned over the years she has been making and developing stylish jewelry designs.
Part One shows the basic tools and techniques starting with an adjustable ring, then moves on to a bracelet, a cabochon pendant, a cabochon ring and earrings. Part Two presents more ambitious projects such as a stacked prong pendant and 'Basil's ring' but also includes simpler projects such as a chain and a butterfly that you might want to make after a supply of leftovers has accumulated. The final project is the simple bead ring that is always a popular item.
This set of videos is nicely produced and is highly recommended for those wanting to learn or
refresh skills to make attractive jewelry by wrapping wire in stylish designs.

INDEX

MINERALS HEAVEN!
1998 AFMS -- MWF CONVENTION
HOUGHTON, MICHIGAN
August 11-16, 1998
Steve Whelan, Show Chairman

FULL SHOW INFORMATION - www.portup.com/~swhelan/ccrmc/

"RED GOLD and TARNISHED SILVER", the 1998 combined MWF and AFMS Field-Trip Convention and show in Houghton, Michigan is featuring fantastic and unique field trips. Mineral collectors will have a rare chance to collect in the heart of the beautiful Lake Superior Copper District. The Copper Country Rock & Mineral Club is hosting the upcoming event.

COPPER COUNTRY MINES AND ASSOCIATED MINERALS AND FIELD TRIP SCHEDULES
$6 per trip/per person bulldozing-fee, unless otherwise noted.
PHOENIX MINE: Copper, Copper xls, Analcime xls, Prehnite, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds, Chlorastrolite (greenstone), Datolite, Apophyllite. Monday 10th: 9am -12noonTuesday 11th 2pm - 5pm
DELAWARE MINE: Datolite, Chlorastrolite, Copper. Monday 10th 1pm - 4pm; Wednesday 12th, 2pm - 5pm;
OJIBWAY MINE: Copper, Copper xls, Silver, Silver xls, Quartz xls (Chlorite inclusions). Wednesday 12th, 9am -12noon; Saturday 15th, 9am -12noon;
SENECA #1,: Copper, Copper xls, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds. Thursday 13th 9am -12noon; Friday 15th 2pm - 5pm;
KEARSARGE #4: Copper, Copper xls, Silver, Silver xls, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds, Prehnite, Epidote xls. Wednesday 12th, 9am -12noon; Friday 14th, 9am -12noon;
IROQUOIS MINE,: Copper, Copper xls, Copper wires on Prehnite, Copper xls on Prehnite, Silver, Silver xls, Prehnite, Calcite xls, Datolite nodules. Tuesday 11th, 9am -12noon;
THOMSONITE HILL, no fee: Thomsonite nodules, Prehnite. Wednesday 12th, 2pm - 5pm; Friday 14th 2pm - 5pm;
CENTRAL EXPLORATION: Copper, Silver, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds, Chlorastrolite, Datolite.
TAYLOR MINE: Pyrolusite xls, Magnetite xls, Quartz xls, Goethite, Rhodochrosite xls. Monday 10th, 1pm - 4pm; Thursday 13th, 1pm - 4pm;
MINESOTA MINE: Copper, Silver, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds, Copper xls, Silver xls, Copper chisel chips, Adularia, Datolite. Tuesday 11th 9am -12noon; Friday 14th 9am -12noon;
CALEDONIA MINE: Copper, Copper xls, Silver, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds, Datolite, Adularia, Epidote cutting material with Copper inclusions. Thursday 13th afternoon: 1pm - 4pm; Friday 14th afternoon: 2pm - 5pm;
CALEDONIA UNDERGROUND: $30/person fee includes hard hat and charged mine lantern Thursday 13th afternoon: 1pm - 4pm; Friday 14th afternoon: 2pm - 5pm; Saturday 15th morning: 9am -12noon;
NEBRASKA MINE: Copper, Copper xls, Adularia, Quartz xls, prehistoric stone hammers. Tuesday 11th 2pm - 5pm;
KNOWLTON MINE: Copper, Copper xls, Silver, Adularia xls, Copper/Silver Halfbreeds, cutting material with Copper inclusions. Thursday 13th 9am -12noon;
ADDITIONAL TRIPMonday, August 10 morning: 9am -12noon; To be announced
For further Information: Steve Whelan, Show Chairman, RR 1, Box 406, Calumet,
Michigan 49913 (906) 337-2599 swhelan@portup.com

INCLUDED IN THE MARCH NEWSLETTER ARE THE AFMS OFFICERS, DIRECTORS AND
COMMITTEE CHAIRS. These are found elsewhere on the web test page
www.galstar.com/~mela/afms.html

INDEX

PUBLICATION INFORMATION

CORRECTION - OFFICERS LIST
Committees - Endowment Fund
EFMLS: Terry Cirrincione, 1611 Decatur St NW Washington DC 20011 (202) 882-6317
tmc@hepinc.com.

A.F.M.S. Newsletter is published monthly by the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies.
A.F.M.S. Central Office
Dan McLennan, P. O. Box 26523
Oklahoma City, OK 73126-0523
(405) 682-2151
A.F.M.S.Newsletter Editor
Mel Albright, Rt. 3 Box 8500
Bartlesville, OK 74003
(918) 336-8036
or mela@galstar.com
ADDRESS CORRECTIONS AND CHANGES
SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION
DISTRIBUTION QUESTIONS
Address maintenance and mail labeling are the responsibility of the AFMS Central Office. All changes and questions should be sent there. The President and the Bulletin Editor of each member club should receive the Newsletter. All others may subscribe. The publisher does the actual mailing.
CONTENT - LETTERS
EDITORIAL COMMENTS - SUBMISSIONS
Any communication concerning the content or format of the Newsletter should be sent to the editor.
Material may be duplicated for non-commercial purposes with attribution. For commercial use,
the individual author(s) must be contacted for approval.

DEADLINE - 10th of the month preceeding the month of issue. Example: Mar. 10 for April issue

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